01/04/2010

Where does 'Spaghetti Bolognaise' come from?

"Back in Italy purists say that Spaghetti Bolognese has nothing to do with the Italian culinary culture. Some time ago, Stefano Bonilli, a renowned Italian gastronomer, who was born in Bologna, wrote: “Spaghetti alla bolognese never existed.” The line of attack? “Spaghetti is dry pasta from Southern Italy, in Bologna, we have tagliatelle, freshly homemade, al ragù bolognese”. The fact is that at least one other ‘sugo’ (sauce) 'alla bolognese' exists and is the one described by Pellegrino Artusi in his The Science in the kitchen and the art of eating well. Not only is Artusi’s ‘bolognese’ not ragù, but the recipe includes maccheroni (macaroni), which are dry pasta, exactly as “Southern” spaghetti are. So, can we say that Spaghetti Bolognese come from that recipe? No way. Artusi doesn’t include tomatoes in his sugo, while Spag Bog is a sauce made with tomatoes (as we have seen, the presence of tomatoes is very limited in the original ragù alla bolognese). So, where does Spaghetti Bolognese come from? It’s hard to say."
http://www.itchefs-gvci.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=459&Itemid=902

***
I was reading something about Italian cuisine, and I came across the paragraph above - about 'Spaghetti Bolognaise'.
That was the view from a 'native' Italian!

In fact, I was there in Bologna few years ago.
Just drop-by and had a day-trip.
I didn't go to any of those 'touristic' destinations (except those Piazza/ Church),
but I did go to the local market to see the food/ ingredients there.

Yes - no spaghetti at all.
They got 'tagliatelle' as mentioned, or 'tortellini' like those below (tiny bites, not like noodles).
And yes - all look fresh, not dry pasta.



So, where does Spaghetti Bolognaise come from?
That was really a good question.

My friends, you know, what I thought of - instantly after I asked myself this question? Garifled & Lasagna!!












**
Actually, I felt like Chinese vs. Italian food is similar in the way that
there are quite a few types of 'regional' cuisine in these countries.

The best way to enjoy them,
probably just travel around the regions,
experience all of the 'originals'!!

YET,
I believe both are quite difficult indeed..
travelling around in China/ Italy -
both requires the language,
the patience, and the great interest to go here & there.

See if I'll have that energy,
and the chanes to travel around Italy/ China!!

Guess that will be a lifelong 'mission'.
Not bad though - keep my ENERGY always high,
plus motivation to work hard/ play hard!

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